Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Between You and Me- Gallery Tour



in the absence of pattern
2012
Excavated screenprint
38” x 41”each, 50” X 128” installed

First I screened a few layers of transparent base over the entire paper. I then monoprinted the linear details and then blocks of color over that. I printed birds in a random pattern and them monotyped flat colors over that. Then I printed black ink over the entire paper. I then excavated the print with a solvent, scrubbing back layers to reveal what is underneath.
in the absence of pattern
2012
in the absence of pattern
2012

in the absence of pattern
2012
How many experiments must we do?
2012
Archival digital photographs with screenprinted layers
21.5” x 17.5”

I digitally printed these photographs and then screen printed over them at Kala Art Institute as an Artist in Residence. It was a freeing experience to not treat digital prints as finished products. 
How many experiments must we do?
2012
mandorla
2012
monotype screenprints
7- 19” x 13”

I painted directly onto the screen mesh for each print and filled with black ink. Each print is unique. In traditional Christian art the mandorla is used to depict sacred moments and refers to the cosmos. 
mandorla
2012
mandorla
2012
pearls
2013
acrylic on plaster
19- 8” x 8“

I applied a thin layer of plaster to a substrate then I used a stencil to apply another layer of plaster in a dot pattern. I used acrylic paint and washes over the plaster in an additive and subtractive method. The title references one of the major diagnostic criteria for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the presence of 12 or more ovarian follicles often giving the appearance of a string of pearls. 
pearls
2013 
pearls
2013
pearls
2013
shadows of the sun
2013
Acrylic on plaster
18- 12” x 12” squares, 40” x 124” installed

I applied a thin layer of plaster to a substrate that I then carved into while wet and then again when dry. I used acrylic paint over the textures and to create textures. 
shadows of the sun
2013
shadows of the sun
2013
searching for heaven in the stars because I miss you
2013
Acrylic, handmade paper and photo transfer
17”x 20”

I used the Dass transfer method to transfer the image of the star guide over the acrylic painting and the images of a fetus onto the small squares of handmade paper.  I think the fetus image is appropriated from an old national geographic but I'm not really sure. The fetus image is manipulated and cropped. I wanted the coloring to resemble a tintype; small, precious and loved . There was something about the gesture of the hands in the picture that spoke to me.
with one stone
2012
Acrylic marbled handmade paper, watercolor, pastel and pencil
3- 19” diameter each, 19” x 64” installed

I marbled this paper using water based paints and inks mixed with a floating medium. Under the marbling I painted simple watercolor shapes accentuated by a salt dusting that created some patterns and texture.  The final layer includes pastel and pencil drawing.
when the sun has not strength to thaw
2013
Acrylic on plaster
6- 12” x 12” each, 14.5” x 97” installed

I applied a thin layer of plaster to a substrate that I then carved into while still wet. I did several acrylic washes and glazes over the textures, filling crevices and wiping the paint away from the high areas. I repeated the additive and subtractive application of color several times burnishing the surface in the process. The title references the first full moon of the year or the beginning of a new cycle.
when the sun has not strength to thaw
2013
clump of cells
2013
plastic prescription bottles
15” diameter each, 144” x 72” installed, variable

I  keep many elements of an installation after it has been disassembled and often draw upon them for new uses—revising, remaking, or recombining elements for subsequent pieces. In 2009 for my MFA exhibition I saved, cleaned, and melted thousands of prescription bottles. I used left over materials from that exhibition to create these new forms. 

clump of cells
2013
2 boys
2013
photograms, screenprint
20” x 23”

The three small photograms were constructed in a makeshift darkroom by stressing photographic paper. A bit of chance was employed when exposing the photographic paper to cigarette lighters, sparklers, heat, sandpaper, bubbles, and other tools before processing. I wanted to create camera-less images without a reference to a specific object. The results are something you might see in a microscope or a telescope. The analog photograms are printed digitally. I created a digital negative of one of the photograms and used it to screenprint the background texture. 

2 boys
2013

carriage
2012
Acrylic marbled handmade paper
10- 27” diameter circles, 132” x132” installed

I marbled this paper in a kiddie pool full of methocellulose. I used water based paints and inks mixed with a floating medium. I used dish soap as a dispersant on the surface of the methocellulose. The dispersant allowed me to exploit the natural patterns created by the chemical reaction.  The cell-like patterns are not desirable in traditional paper marbling but that flaw attracted me to the medium.   

carriage
2012

carriage
2012

carriage
2012

The circle is deceptively simple. The eye, the egg, the womb, the Sun. Circular patterns or structures are reproduced at all levels of existence, from the macrocosm to the microcosm, constellations to cell division. These works visually explore the mysterious biological processes of reproduction, growth, and death creating an analogy between the circle and the cell. My personal experience with fertility treatments and the commercialization of reproduction has motivated me to visually explore the usually unseen inner processes of the body in these works.  
Rueff West Gallery at Purdue University

Rueff West Gallery at Purdue University

Rueff West Gallery at Purdue University

Rueff West Gallery at Purdue University

Jasmine Begeske is an Indiana based artist, photographer and educator.  She is a Clinical Instructor of Educational Studies at Purdue University. She earned her BFA in photography from Indiana University and her MFA in photography and related media from Purdue University. She was recently awarded an Individual Artists Grant by the Indiana Arts Commission. Her work manifests itself through a wide range of forms - installation, photography, painting, printmaking, bookmaking, sculptural works or any combination of these.
Rueff East Gallery at Purdue University

Rueff East Gallery at Purdue University

Rueff East Gallery at Purdue University

Rueff East Gallery at Purdue University

Rueff East Gallery at Purdue University

Sunday, May 19, 2013

"clump of cells" in progress


Clump of Cells is a work in progress. I made the prototype last week and my "intern" worked on these last night. I'm contemplating how to hang these sculptures, on the wall or from the ceiling. Since they are translucent, light is very important to their placement. I am going to try to fabricate a clear plexiglass bracket to have them attached to the wall but float about 6 inches away from it. I'm not sure if I am going to hard wire them so they give off light or just focus pinpoint gallery lighting on them to cast shadows. 

Thursday, May 9, 2013

phototransfer of iphone image


15x15 in.

100 POSSIBILITIES

This is my little part in the project 100 POSSIBILITIES. Explanation from the website...

"In honor of CAA’s Centennial, the artist Sheryl Oring asked 2012 Annual Conference attendees a single question: What is the role of the artist?
Over the course of a two-day performance in Los Angeles, Oring posed the question to her visitors and transcribed their answers verbatim onto note cards using a manual typewriter, with a goal of collecting one hundred answers. Hence the title of her work, 100 Possibilities. Collectively, these answers will paint a portrait of academic views about the role of the artist as CAA enters its second century as a professional organization.
Oring’s performance took place at the Los Angeles Convention Center from 1:00 to 5:00 PM on Wednesday, February 22, and Thursday, February 23, 2012—or until she received her one hundred answers."

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

when the sun has not strength to thaw






acrylic on plaster on canvas backing



Sunday, April 28, 2013

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies publication


I am ecstatic that Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies will publish an image from my installation, Surrogate for their special issue on reproductive technology and reproductive justice. In celebration of its fortieth anniversary in 2015, Frontiers will devote one special issue per year for the next five years to reflections on significant events and topics from the past four decades. My work will be included in the 2013 special issue, guest edited by Mytheli Sreenivas, which will commemorate Roe vs. Wade and focus on reproductive rights, reproductive justice, and reproductive technologies. The editorial team thought that my photograph was “quite provocative and striking.” What an honor to be included in one of the oldest and most respected feminist journals in the United States. Hooray for a scholarly publication that embraces feminist and gender conscious artists!